Christmas is not a time nor a season, but a state of mind. To cherish peace and goodwill, be plenteous in mercy is to have the real spirit of Christmas. Calvin Coolidge.

Monday, 3 December 2012

The history of the Christmas glass ball’s creation



In the middle of the 19th century natural products such as nuts, sweets and apples or other fruit that were used to decorate the Christmas tree began to replace by artificial ones.  In 1858 a severe draught occurred in the region of the northern Vosges and the Moselle, the territory of Alsace, and a harvest of apples and other fruits turned out very scant, so the local residents had no opportunity to decorate Christmas tree with natural products. Then a glassblower from the Goetzenbruck village decided to create glass balls in the shape of apples and other fruits. After that the Christmas glass balls widely spread outside of Alsace. 

5 comments:

  1. I think everybody will agree that christmas ornaments are now an indispensable part of Christmas tree decorations. The manufacture and sale of Christmas ornaments makes one of the greatest markets worldwide. Despite being increasingly commercialized, the use of Christmas ornaments lend its own special charm, an alacrity to the old tradition of Christmas every year and infuse true enthusiasm in the Christmas celebrations.

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  2. Glass making was done in Bohemia (modern Czechoslovakia) and along the border areas with Germany at a place in Thuringia called Lauscha. In the 17th century, glass beads were made for chandeliers and for decorating dresses. Some of the early strings of chandelier beads also were used for decorating Christmas Trees, an d a type of wooden chandelier with Nativity figures carved along its arms, called a Spinne, because the candlelight reflecting on the strings of tiny beads resembled a spiders web glistening in the frost.

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  3. Early Glass balls were made at Lauscha as end of day games. Glass blowing was thirsty work, and the blowers would drink a lot of ale. Mild though it was, by the end of the day, many were a little merry, and would have these glass blowing games to see who could blow the largest ball before the glass burst! These balls were gathered up by the wives, who would silver them, by swirling a silver nitrate solution around the insides, and take them to the Christmas markets at Coburg etc. There they were sold as Christmas balls to avert evil from the home over Christmas, hung or stuck onto sticks in the hallway of the house. This custom was a later version of the Holy Bough customs, a vague memory of keeping bad things from the house at the Holy Season.

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  4. Christmas ornaments are now an indispensable part of Christmas tree decorations. The manufacture and sale of Christmas ornaments makes one of the greatest markets worldwide. Despite being increasingly commercialized, the use of Christmas ornaments lend its own special charm, an alacrity to the old tradition of Christmas every year and infuse true enthusiasm in the Christmas celebrations.

    ReplyDelete